Monthly Archives: June 2008

Yogurt update

The first batch of yogurt was almost a flop.  Here is what it looked like going in:

I used hazelnut milk and the starter from GI prohealth that is milk and soy free.  It said for the alternative milks to let it ferment for 8-10 hours and to experiment with the amount of starter and the fermentation time.  I set it up and went to bed figuring the kids would wake me in plenty of time.  By the time they did wake me the yogurt had fermented for 11 hours.  It looked like this coming out:






Pretty yucky huh!!!  At first I was just going to throw it away but since the milk and starter are so expensive I decided to experiment some more.  I used some of Jen’s thickener and got it to the right consistency.  It certainly isn’t creamy but it’s at least yogurt consistency.  Then for the flavoring.

That’s easier said than done for a picky toddler!!  I tried first with some smoothie mix that I had saved from our last batch but that was a no go.  Moved on to grape jam with the same results.  Then I remembered that I had some stage 2 baby food in the basement that I had bought when we first had to increase her liquids to honey thick and we were trying to avoid dehydration.  Ahhh….peach cobbler flavor and success!!  Here is a pic of her eating her peach cobbler flavored yogurt:






Of course, being a picky toddler she ate the first serving very well and now she wants nothing to do with it so I may end up throwing it all away anyway.  Baby steps though, baby steps.  Right?!
(still working on this post with the slow dial up so come back again)
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Ice pops and yogurt



 

Living with MSPI means not being able to eat yogurt that can be found in the regular grocery stores.  They are all either milk or soy based.  Instead we have to use a rice based yogurt found only in health food stores.  But at $1.89 for a 6 oz cup it’s a bit expensive depsite the fact that Jen loves it.  


To try and save some money I have decided to try and make my own yogurt.  Last night the first batch went in.  I used hazelnut  milk as the base and the starter from GI Pro Health.  It  fermented for 11 hours and then went into the fridge.


 The directions said to ferment for 8-10 hours for the alternative milks and then to refridgerate for 6 hours after and then it would be set.  You’ll have to come back for the outcome as it wasn’t looking so hot when it went into the fridge!!  All separated 
and ichy looking.  Check the next post for the continuation of this 
part………….


As for the ice pops part of this post…..living with a laryngeal cleft means thickening EVERYTHI

NG that is fluid for Jen.  This includes ice pops.  How do you do that you ask?  I didn’t think you could and didn’t think that Jen would be able to enjoy ice pops this summer.  But thanks to a great SLP I have a way!!  
We make either juice or smoothie based ice pops.  Once the “liquid” part is ready then we add enough thickener to the solution to make it the consistency that is safe for Jen to swallow.  Into the freezer and abbra cadabra thickened ice pops!!

The pictures in this post (not all are here so come back in a few days to see the rest as I’m impatient with uploading any more!!)  are because at first while we were experimenting with ice pop making we were originally making ice pops using dixie cups and straws.  Not the best way!!  


So we went on an adventure looking for actual ice pop molds and the kids were so excited when we found them.  Then last night we sat around the blender and made smoothies out of oatmilk, bananas, mango and strawberries.  Added some thickener and into the molds.


The nice thing about knowing that we can do this too is that we can enjoy ice cream as a family outing this summer.  We just bring an ice pop for Jen in a cooler and she is fine with eating this while we are enjoying our ice cream.  

We can also do ice cream based ones.  We use rice based ice cream due to the MSPI, soften it in the microwave just until it is soft enough to work with, mix in the thickener and refreeze.  Works like a charm!!!  Living with these chronic conditions is bothersome to say the least but a little adaptation goes a long way 🙂